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Llanes - Celorio
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Km 0
Llanes - Celorio (Eastern Asturias)
6 kms
On foot 4 h. (round trip)
Difficulty
Layout of the route

A fairly easy trail through the borough of Llanes

Summary Llanes - Celorio

The coastal footpath from Llanes to Celorio begins at Paseo San Pedro, on Sablón Beach, right in the heart of the town of Llanes.

Llanes is nestled on the coastal strip between El Cuera Range and the Bay of Biscay, an area forming part of the Eastern Coastline Protected Landscape, rich in scenery and history, with abundant examples of the actions of man since the Paleolithic. This was on the Roman road between Oyarzum and La Coruña, and this land saw the commencement of the raids that led to the Retaking of Spain from the Moors ("La Reconquista"). The town charter was drawn up in 1228, creating the town to fight against the influence of San Vicente de La Barquera.

Cloth, iron, oil and manufactured goods entered through its harbour, while wood, oranges, chestnuts, hazelnuts, walnuts, butter and salted preserves were exported to Ireland, England, France, Portugal and the Netherlands.

Other important maritime industries were salting and whaling. Corn and beans ("fabes") were grown in its fields, and livestock breeding was ever prevalent here. The local tile makers were very well known, leaving their villages in the summer to carry their trade throughout the Principality, the Mountains -Cantabria-- and the lands of Castile.

The town of Llanes was guarded by a wall, a fair part of which still remains standing, and by a fort between the harbour and Sablón Beach.

In 1509, a fire almost entirely destroyed Llanes. By 1800, almost all its inhabitants still held the status of nobles, and there was a fair level of enlightenment. Of the French occupation, there remain the ruins of the palace of the Dukes of Estrada.

Today Llanes is a thriving town, replete with fine architecture: medieval mansions and Indiano villas built by returning emigrants who had made their fortune in the Americas, and the exceptional Casino (social club) building.

The hiking trail starts out from the San Pedro Promenade, a scenic balcony overlooking both the sea and the town, heading west towards Poo. The pastures begin once you leave the town, the trail passing through the area known as "Malzapato", 1 km from the start, and passing by La Atalá and Punta de Xarri on the right. The trail then runs between farms where herds of cows belonging to the local Asturiana de los Valles breed graze. These are known as Los Jorcaos meadows.

The old road to Oviedo and the railway line can be seen on the left. It was in Llanes where the Ferrocarriles Económicos de Asturias railway linked up with the Ferrocarril del Cantábrico railway. The El Cuera and Plana de La Borbolla Ranges can be seen behind the railway tracks. The former is responsible for the borough being the wettest part of Asturias. The scenic area of Alburri is 3 km on from there. Shortly after you come to the surroundings of Poo. The trail veers north toward the beach, which is worth visiting.

After leaving the village, the path crosses the River Vallina and heads between fields to Poo Islet. This constitutes the scenic area of El Portillo. The islets, called "castros" here, can be easily seen from these heights: Poo, Pelau, San Martí, Gaiteru and Amielles.

La Boriza is 6 km further on. Now it's just a question of heading down to Celorio, where the Monastery and Hostal of San Salvador were founded in 1017. The creation of this monastery brought agricultural development to the entire region. From the time of its founding, only the Romanesque tower, reminiscent of Oviedo Cathedral, and an inner porch still remain. Inhabited by Benedictine monks, it reached its peak in the 17th century. It was acquired by private individuals during the Ecclesiastical Confiscations of Mendizábal, and later by the Jesuits, who are its current occupants. It boasts very valuable archives miraculously preserved from the vicissitudes of history.

Some 6.8 km from the monastery lies the beautiful beach of Las Cámaras, the end of the trail.

6 kms
Description Llanes - Celorio

The coastal footpath from Llanes to Celorio begins at Paseo San Pedro, on Sablón Beach, right in the heart of the town of Llanes.

Llanes is nestled on the coastal strip between El Cuera Range and the Bay of Biscay, an area forming part of the Eastern Coastline Protected Landscape, rich in scenery and history, with abundant examples of the actions of man since the Paleolithic. This was on the Roman road between Oyarzum and La Coruña, and this land saw the commencement of the raids that led to the Retaking of Spain from the Moors ("La Reconquista"). The town charter was drawn up in 1228, creating the town to fight against the influence of San Vicente de La Barquera.

Cloth, iron, oil and manufactured goods entered through its harbour, while wood, oranges, chestnuts, hazelnuts, walnuts, butter and salted preserves were exported to Ireland, England, France, Portugal and the Netherlands.

Other important maritime industries were salting and whaling. Corn and beans ("fabes") were grown in its fields, and livestock breeding was ever prevalent here. The local tile makers were very well known, leaving their villages in the summer to carry their trade throughout the Principality, the Mountains -Cantabria-- and the lands of Castile.

The town of Llanes was guarded by a wall, a fair part of which still remains standing, and by a fort between the harbour and Sablón Beach.

In 1509, a fire almost entirely destroyed Llanes. By 1800, almost all its inhabitants still held the status of nobles, and there was a fair level of enlightenment. Of the French occupation, there remain the ruins of the palace of the Dukes of Estrada.

Today Llanes is a thriving town, replete with fine architecture: medieval mansions and Indiano villas built by returning emigrants who had made their fortune in the Americas, and the exceptional Casino (social club) building.

The hiking trail starts out from the San Pedro Promenade, a scenic balcony overlooking both the sea and the town, heading west towards Poo. The pastures begin once you leave the town, the trail passing through the area known as "Malzapato", 1 km from the start, and passing by La Atalá and Punta de Xarri on the right. The trail then runs between farms where herds of cows belonging to the local Asturiana de los Valles breed graze. These are known as Los Jorcaos meadows.

The old road to Oviedo and the railway line can be seen on the left. It was in Llanes where the Ferrocarriles Económicos de Asturias railway linked up with the Ferrocarril del Cantábrico railway. The El Cuera and Plana de La Borbolla Ranges can be seen behind the railway tracks. The former is responsible for the borough being the wettest part of Asturias. The scenic area of Alburri is 3 km on from there. Shortly after you come to the surroundings of Poo. The trail veers north toward the beach, which is worth visiting.

After leaving the village, the path crosses the River Vallina and heads between fields to Poo Islet. This constitutes the scenic area of El Portillo. The islets, called "castros" here, can be easily seen from these heights: Poo, Pelau, San Martí, Gaiteru and Amielles.

La Boriza is 6 km further on. Now it's just a question of heading down to Celorio, where the Monastery and Hostal of San Salvador were founded in 1017. The creation of this monastery brought agricultural development to the entire region. From the time of its founding, only the Romanesque tower, reminiscent of Oviedo Cathedral, and an inner porch still remain. Inhabited by Benedictine monks, it reached its peak in the 17th century. It was acquired by private individuals during the Ecclesiastical Confiscations of Mendizábal, and later by the Jesuits, who are its current occupants. It boasts very valuable archives miraculously preserved from the vicissitudes of history.

Some 6.8 km from the monastery lies the beautiful beach of Las Cámaras, the end of the trail.